Tennis

Tennis - 16th Century through 2013 & Beyond

Tennis History

Most historians believe that tennis originated in northern Portugal in the 6th century, but the ball was then struck with the palm of the hand hence the name jeu de paume (“game of the palm”). It was not until the 16th century that rackets came into use, and the game began to be called "tennis." It was popular in England and France, although the game was only played indoors where the ball could be hit off the wall. This later created much controversy between many people who thought that it was unfair for the opposing team. They claimed the other team was able to hit the ball in a certain way for it to hit the wall and come back to them. Henry VIII of England was a big fan of this game, which historians now refer to as real tennis.



  • The Bud Collins History of Tennis: An Authoritative Encyclopedia and Record Book

    Compiled by the most famous tennis journalist and historian in the world, this book is the ultimate compilation of historical tennis information, including year-by-year recaps of every tennis season, biographical sketches of every major tennis personality, as well as stats, records, and championship rolls for all the major events. Newly updated with the latest history-making records in the sport, this revised edition covers the recent achievements of a variety of tennis stars, including Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Serena Williams, and Ivo Karlovic. Highlighting the author’s personal relationships with major names in the sport, this resource offers insights into the world of professional tennis found nowhere else.

    Authors: Bud Collins

    Tennis: The Davis Cup - 1900's

    The Davis Cup, an annual competition between men's national teams, dates to 1900.
    The analogous competition for women's national teams, the Fed Cup, was founded as the Federation Cup in 1963 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the founding of the ITF also known as International Tennis Federation.

    Tennis: Professional Tour - 1926

    In 1926, promoter C.C. Pyle established the first professional tennis tour with a group of American and French tennis players playing exhibition matches to paying audiences.
    The most notable of these early professionals were the American Vinnie Richards and the Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen.
    Once a player turned pro he or she could not compete in the major (amateur) tournaments.

    The Tennis Book: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of World Tennis

    Written by two of the game's leading authorities, The Tennis Book is the definitive work on one of the world's most exhilarating sports. Loaded with over 200 photographs, this comprehensive volume traces tennis from its aristocratic beginnings in the 1800s to the high-energy, all-action global sport of today. With profiles of court legends, insightful analysis of the greatest matches, and an in-depth look at the politics, controversies, and oddities of the game, The Tennis Book serves up an unmatched collection of aces.

    Authors: John Parsons (Author), Henry Wancke (Author), Tim Henman (Foreword)

    Tennis: Open Era - 1968

    In 1968, commercial pressures and rumors of some amateurs taking money under the table led to the abandonment of this distinction, inaugurating the open era, in which all players could compete in all tournaments, and top players were able to make their living from tennis.
    With the beginning of the open era, the establishment of an international professional tennis circuit, and revenues from the sale of television rights, tennis's popularity has spread worldwide, and the sport has shed its upper/middle-class English-speaking image.

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Tennis Books